Tag Archives: society

What it Means to be an “Open-Admission” Animal Shelter

14 May

For those who are hard of hearing, or just prefer reading, the text version is below:

Hey everyone, so this is my first video blog…hopefully in a long series of video blogs.

And I’m bringing this to you, because as some of you may know I work at an animal shelter. If you didn’t already know that, you do now! Before I go any further, I am just going to mention that I am not going to say the name of the shelter I work at, but just in case any of you deduce it or already know it, I am not a representative of my animal shelter.

I work for an Open Admission shelter, so that’s actually what I’m going to be talking about today. What is an open admission shelter?

An Open Admission shelter is similar to the equal opportunity act. An employer won’t discriminate based on age, sex, creed, religion, or any of those things, and an open admission shelter functions in much the same way. We won’t discriminate what animals we bring in. We will take in a 1 day old puppy, or a 17 year old dog. We’ll take in aggressive and dangerous dogs, and then of course we will take in the normal dog.

Even if we don’t have space in the shelter, we will still accept animals…we will make space.

The opposite of an Open Admission Shelter is a Limited Admission Shelter. A limited Admission shelter is what you would usually call a rescue. The great thing about limited admission shelter is that they get to choose which animals they take in – they are often breed-based, so they may only take in specific breeds, like yorkies or large breeds. Open admission shelters often utilize these rescues when we don’t have the resources to work with an animal to give them a home.

The estimated number of owned animals in the United States in 2012 is 179 million cats and dogs.

The number of stray animals estimated in 2012 is 70 million.

70 million. That’s a lot!

The unfortunate reality of this numbers, is that we can’t place all of these animals. We have a variety of resources we may utilize – we can try transferring to limited admission shelters than I mentioned earlier. They often have more resources per animal because they have fewer animals. We might also try fostering an animal if it has an issue we can work with, but isn’t quite ready for adoption.

Being a nonprofit organization, means we have limited resources, and unfortunately those run out.

Even though we can take in all animals, we don’t always have the resources to safely or effectively adopt those animals out. And it is for this reason, that Open Admission shelters perform euthanasia.

Would you want a dog that escaped its yard and killed another animal, or mauled a child, to live next to Grandma? Or you? Or maybe you have kids…do you want this dog as your own pet?

Or what about a cat that is so aggressive, you can’t touch it? Or a cat that is so terrified, it can’t function?

Would you be willing to pay even $100 for a dog that may pass away within the next 6 months?

These are all issues we face when we are trying to decide if an animal is an adoptable animal.

I don’t speak for all shelters when I say this, but our adoptable animals don’t have a shelf life. Once they pass behavioral evaluations and medical assessments and are made available, they remain on the adoption floor until they are adopted.

If an animal is on the adoption floor for an extended period of time (1 or 2 months) we may transfer that animal to another facility in hopes that it may find its forever home in that community. Just because we aren’t reaching the right adopters, doesn’t mean they aren’t out there.

The goal is to reduce the number of animals without a home, and do reduce the number of animals subjected to cruelty each year.

If you have any questions, please get them to me. I want this to be an open discussion, so share this, and give me your questions. Maybe I’ll even answer them in a follow-up video blog! I want to answer them and dispel any myths or rumors you may have heard about open-admission shelters!

 

Things Exist for a Purpose

5 Mar

As I sit here watching shows on alien theory on the Science channel, you know that they are picking my brain.

The question the show is currently posing is if a faith in a godly figure would be universal and would exist with aliens. The researchers are arguing that humans prefer purpose-based reasons for why things exist over their science-based reasons. For example:

Purpose-based: The sun produces light so plants can photosynthesize.
Science-based: Plants photosynthesize because light produced by the sun can be used as an energy source.

They tested children first, and found that they much preferred purpose-based, but they also wanted to test adults. They used a true-false system that required adults to read purpose-based sentences, and as quickly as possible choose true or false. The adults also seemed to prefer purpose-based.

What I wonder is the religious background of each of the participants. Many of us are trying to get rid of this dichotomous categorization that we use so frequently and hope to lead our children to find what they believe to be true on their own. Part of this involves religious faith. We want to expose our children and show them the options, and let them choose which ever seems to be right. I do feel, however, that most children are raised to believe that a god exists, and within that, are raised to believe that everything was created for a purpose. This would explain why purpose-based explanations are preferred.

I would like to see the results of children and adults that were raised outside of this. That is difficult to do, just as it is to raise children outside of gender norms, but I wonder if it is really nature that causes these test groups to prefer purpose-based explanations, or if it is the nurture behind it.

Do you think humans naturally prefer purpose-based explanations, or do you think it’s something that is taught to us? How do you think you’d perform on the adult version of the test?

30 Day Letter Challenge: Dear Stranger

17 Jun

Dear Stranger,

I hope that when I look at you and smile, you don’t think I’m creepy. I hope that you know that I am an ally in this struggle we call life, and I hope that you take my smile, know it will all be okay, and help someone else realize the same.

I hope that when avoid eye contact, you don’t think I’m rude. I’m just having a rough day, is all. Or I might just need some time to myself. Life is more frustrating some days than others. Hopefully, you don’t take to heart that I don’t want to be your hero today. Some days, I need a hero.

I hope that when you see me you see a human being, just like yourself. That’s really all I am, even on my best days. Ask me for help, I’ll give you all I can. Push me away, and I’ll give you your space. Say hi, and I’ll undoubtedly say hi back. Why? Because you are a human being, just like me.

I know you don’t know me, but if you look deep inside I think you could get an idea of who I am. Never forget it…we’re only human.

Always, Me

The Obsession with Being Impolite

20 Jul

 

All cultures have a set of rules that dictates what are socially acceptable actions. Politeness has its own set of guidelines that can progress and change. They also often vary depending on the relationship of the people involved.

Being politely is personally very important, but I’ve found that isn’t the case with a lot of people. Americans are often thought of as rude and demanding, and it is obvious why, but I don’t understand the reasoning behind it. As far as I’m aware, you should say please when you are asking someone to do something, and thank them when they do. You should excuse yourself if you burp. You should open doors for people. If someone says something to you, you respond. Don’t interrupt someone when they are talking. It is also polite to smile when you see someone on the street, and ask people how they are, but that might be just because I’m from a small town.

All of those things are standard for our culture, but why do we refuse to partake? I know so many people who refuse to excuse themselves when they burp, because “everyone does it, and its a perfectly normal bodily function.” That’s true, but you don’t see me running around naked when I go to the grocery store. Please and thank you are even more standard, but people seem to forget them. Just because someone’s job is to bring you food or serve you drinks doesn’t mean that you should not say please. Honestly, they don’t haveto do anything for you. We do things like this because they are polite, and well…because you don’t want anyone to spit in your food.

I can’t figure out if its because we are a young country, and this just might be in the course of development, or if its really just Americans. Do we feel so entitled that we just think we don’t need to be polite? Is it the obsession with being different just so overwhelming that we can’t be polite?

Do you think being polite is important? Is being impolite an American thing, or do you think its the same everywhere? Why do you think people are so impolite?