Tag Archives: politically correct

Please, Call Me Fat

30 Jan

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If you haven’t seen the article yet, Matel has officially announced the release of the new Barbies: petite, tall, and curvy. Find the article here. You can also check out the various skin tones, ethnicities, eye shapes, and face shapes (and order your own Barbie!) at the Barbie.com website.

The new Barbies are absolutely gorgeous! That isn’t to say that I didn’t find original Barbie gorgeous, or even that I had a problem with her portrayal of women’s bodies. I didn’t. But these new Barbie’s are so beautiful! I was absolutely thrilled when I first laid eyes on curvy Barbie’s figure; it was so similar to mine!

But alas, we decided to call her curvy (which I won’t say she isn’t). Marketing a fat Barbie would’ve been a nightmare, so I get it (don’t get me started about “curvy women’s clothing). I’m also sure that half of the women out there, regardless of size or struggle, would be up in arms about that.

But I’m here to say please, call me fat.

After all, it’s what I am. I’m blessed that my fat falls in some of the more desirable places, but those curves are still made up of fat. We’ve decided that in order to be sensitive, we need to stop saying fat, but that just disguises the issue. If being fat is okay, then saying someone is fat is okay. I don’t want to be attractive because I’m fat, and I don’t want to be unattractive because I’m fat, I want to be attractive regardless of it. When we refuse to say “fat”, it feels like we should not only be ashamed of the word but of ourselves, too. Of course, I don’t want to disregard others struggles, because there are so many body types that could also be considered “fat” or “curvy”.

I am fat. I weigh 250 lbs. I’m okay with it. You should be too.

What is a descriptive term you feel we’ve removed from our repertoire to try to be “sensitive”, but it ends up working against us? How do you feel about “fat” vs. “curvy”?

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Why I Don’t Use the Term African-American

8 May

 

As I sat here watching TV, potentially blogging or studying, I heard a recount of someone’s interaction with a criminal. When the investigator asked them for a physical description, the person replied that they looked European. That caught my attention.

How do you look European?

And for that matter, why do we call black people African-American or Hispanic people Mexican or Mexican-American?

First, there are so many countries in Europe, and such a variety of people, that I don’t think someone can look European, just like I don’t think its possible to look American. Then, there is the term African-American. I’ve had several discussions about the term, and some people prefer to be called African-American, some prefer to be called black, and others prefer whatever comes naturally. I hear its also “politically correct”.

I don’t like it. I don’t use it. The people we usually refer to as African-American aren’t actually from Africa; They are from the United States.  The people who are from Africa, aren’t necessarily black, either. Ever seen The Color of Friendship? The girl gets a foreign exchange student from Africa, who ends up being white, much to the dismay of the host sister. For all we know, the child on the left in the picture was born in the US, and the child on the right was born in Africa. The same goes with the term Mexican, or Mexican-American. I am not from Mexico. My grandparents were, yes, but I amnot. The only people who should rightfully be called Mexican are people who live in Mexico, and the only people who should rightfully be called Mexican-American are people who have moved from Mexico to the US (even though Mexico is part of America – I’ll not discuss this now). Future note – don’t call me Mexican, I prefer Hispanic (I’m actually a halfer, so I prefer to be called a halfer, but whatever).

Another point I’d like to make is on the use of the terms ‘black’ and ‘white’. Another situation I was overhearing or reading (I don’t remember) involved a father telling someone about a person – lets say Joe. The person the father was talking to didn’t remember who Joe was, so the father said something along the lines of “the black man that was over here the other day” to which the person became somewhat offended, and asked why it was necessary to say ‘the black man’ and that it was racist.

My theory on this is that it all depends on the context and variety of company of which normally visits the household. If the family normally has non-black visitors, then it would be easiest to say that Joe was the black visitor. If a family normally has black visitors, it would be just as easy to say Joe was the white visitor (assuming that Joe was white). Its a means to contrast the normal with the novel. If there were multiple races of visitors, however, it would become necessary to use other means. Say there are two black men, two white men, and two hispanic men visiting. It wouldn’t make sense to say that Joe was the black visitor, because that doesn’t help the person understand who Joe is. This is when you would say Joe was the tall oneJoe was the short one, or Joe was the really skinny one. Its just the same as if Joe was actually a woman, when most visitors are men. It is acceptable to say “she was the woman”, so why would it not be acceptable to say that “he was the black man”?

Which terms do you use? Do you have a preference for what people refer to you as? Do you agree with me about the use of contrast when describing people?