Living in the Mountains

31 Jan

I’ll be honest and say that I haven’t really experienced real “mountain living”, at least not yet.

The closest I’ve experienced is driving 25 mph up curvy canyon roads, just to get home and possibly be snowed in today. And that whole not sure if driving back into town is worth the money it costs in gas. Granted, if someone asked me right now, or even any night, to come hang out with them I would most likely head that way immediately.

I haven’t actually been snowed in yet, or had anything major happen, but my most recent move has brought about a few minor issues. First, there is the land line. Each time I pick up the phone I have to consciously think about if what I want to say to someone is worth calling them for. I can’t just send off a text. The phone that came with the apartment is a corded phone, to boot, but I might have to fix that sooner rather than later. And no one calls me. Ever. Really, its quite sad.

And then there is the water. It’s well water, and while I haven’t had it run out on me yet, each time I take a shower I worry that the water pressure won’t be enough to properly rinse my hair, so I end up towling my hair before I even finish the rest of my shower. I constantly think about what water-consuming tasks I need to do, and how much water I need for each, so that I don’t simultaneously run water for a load of dishes, put a load of laundry in, and then hop in the shower only to run out of water.

Speaking of dishes, that whole kitchen appliance thing is really kicking my butt. I have no dishwasher, and somehow my single existence seems to create just as many dishes as a family of 4. I’ve been keeping up, but damn! Then, just this morning, I found a whole new issue that I knew about, but when I realized what I was doing it was already too late.

Not only do I not have a dishwasher, but I don’t have a microwave or a toaster either (in my defense, my parents are storing them and I should have them next week). All morning I was looking forward to a nice bowl of Cream of Wheat, so when I got to the kitchen and realized I had to make it on the stove, I was exasperated. I’ve never had to do that before, and of course, I boiled over the milk, which I now have to go clean up. With every bowl of Cream of Wheat, I always make two pieces of toast. Toast. No toaster. That was another hard blow.

But I made my toast. On the stove. Kinda like grilled cheese.

So what would normally have taken a microwave-safe bowl, a plate to put toast on, a knife to put butter on the toast, and a spoon to eat my Cream of Wheat with took a pot, a skillet, two cooking spoons, a spatula, a bowl, a plate, a spoon, and a knife. And the cleaning supplies to clean up my boiled-over milk.

Yes, this entire post was about me whining about having to make Cream of Wheat on the stove.

What generally taken-for-granted items do you regularly go without? What’s the proper way to toast bread without a toaster? What was the last time you can remember not having something you rely on greatly, and how did you deal with it?

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2 Responses to “Living in the Mountains”

  1. Perpetual Musings January 31, 2014 at 4:22 pm #

    My absolute favourite way to make toast, I discovered one winter while stuck at my uncle’s cottage without wheels, is on the wood stove. Nothing compares. You could also pan fry it, or stick it in the oven. For a while I used a coathanger bent into shape over the stove, but that one can be tricky!

    While these things you describe take up more time and effort, it gives you a chance to be grateful for all those things we often take for granted. Like microwaves and toasters.

    When I spent lots of time at my uncle’s, I had to watch my water usage too. That was hard, but it gave me a chance to prioritize and become more mindful of how much I actually consume on a day to day basis at home. I’ve never owned a dishwasher, grew up washing my own dishes and I’m talking modern times. We were just kinda broke. So I can’t sympathize for that one, but hey.

    It doesn’t all sound so bad to me, but I’m used to roughing it!

    • mishie1 February 1, 2014 at 9:59 am #

      Yeah, we didn’t have a dishwasher when I was younger either…we redid the house when I was probably about 10 to 12 and we got one then, so while I was growing into adulthood, I had one.

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